Redevelopment Cleanup Bill Sparks Relief, Outrage Among Cities

For many cities that have endured the painful process of dissolving their redevelopment agencies, the bloodletting has begun anew. 

In Roundup of Local Land Use Measures, San Francisco Wins for Most Contentious City

A typically diverse array of land use measures appears on the November ballot in a handful of localities around the state. Most questions ask voters to endorse or oppose specific developments, from a golf course redevelopment in El Dorado County to a park in San Carlos. Only the City of Modesto has a sweeping, citywide question, billed as a referendum on urban sprawl. 

Then there is the City and County of San Francisco, arguably the most unique and hotly contested 49 square miles in the country. This November, it has a whole state’s worth of propositions. They range from a proposed local moratorium on development to restrictions on Airbnb and the like to a major $310 million housing bond that Mayor Ed Lee has been promoting. 

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Brown Vetoes Civic San Diego Bill and Atkins Tax Credit; Signs Parking Bill

Gov. Jerry Brown has vetoed two planning bills by significant San Diego legislators -- AB 504 by Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, which would have reined in the permitting power of Civic San Diego, the nonprofit redevelopment agency, and AB 35 by Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, which would have increased the state's allocation of low-income housing tax credits by $300 million.

However, Brown signed several important bills, including SB 744, which requires lower parking ratios in infill situations; AB 323, which extends a CEQA exemption for city roadway improvements; AB 2, which brings back limited tax-increment financing; and SB 107, a redevelopment cleanup bill.

Brown vetoed the tax credit bill as part of a package of nine bills he vetoed in order to maintain the state's strong fiscal situation. He tipped his hand last week in a plenary at the Urban Land Institute in San Francisco when he said he generally opposed tax credits because it is not usually possible to remove them in hard fiscal times.

Gonzalez has promoted AB 504 as a way of restoring permitting power to San Diego City Hall, in part to give the City Council the ability to impose labor requirements on downtown projects including hotels. As the successor to the Centre City Development Commission, Civic San Diego does issue permits from some downtown buildings. In his veto message, Brown said the issue should be resolved locally, not at the state level.

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Most Major Bills Fail In Legislative Session

Only a few significant planning and development bills made to Gov. Jerry Brown's desk by the end of the legislative session on Sept. 11 -- most significantly SB 774, which requires local governments to cut parking ratios for transit-oriented development.

Several major bills did not make it out of the legislature, including:

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CEQA Bills Stall, GHG Bill Moves Forward

With the year’s legislative session in full gear, attempts to reform – or end-run – the California Environmental Quality Act don’t seem to be doing so well. But Sen. Fran Pavley’s effort to codify an 80% greenhouse gas reduction target by 2050 – which would moot some major legal challenges – appears to be sailing through.

Legislation items are listed, by category and in numerical order, according to bill number, bill name, sponsor, description, and status as of press time. This list will be updated periodically to reflect new developments.


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CP&DR News Briefs, May 18, 2015: L.A. Mobility Plan; Delta Smelt Face Extinction; Solar Power Plan Postponed

The Los Angeles Planning Commission advised the City Council to adopt the city's proposed Mobility Plan 2035 (pdf), update the land use element of 35 community plans, and adopt an ordinance to implement new street standards and complete street principles.

Rumors of Redevelopment’s Resurrection Greatly Exaggerated

When Jerry Brown first proposed killing redevelopment -- back in January 2011, when he released his first budget -- he said he would replace it with some other economic development tool. After Brown succeeded -- when he released his second budget, in January 2012, just days after the Supreme Court killed redevelopment – his tune changed, ever so slightly. He said he would consider bringing redevelopment back if it didn't affect the state's general fund.

Fair enough.

November 2012 Land Use Ballot Measures

It’s safe to say that the City of Calistoga’s Silver Rose Referendum will not be the most important question on the ballot in the this November. Nor will Escondido’s general plan measure, nor even a preliminary vote on draining Hetch Hetchy reservoir.

Roundup of Land Use Laws, 2012

While Gov. Jerry Brown’s veto of redevelopment-related bills and the earlier failure of parking reform bill Assembly Bill 904 caused some consternation around the state, he did in fact sign a wide array of bills relating to land use at the end of last month. 

Redevelopment Vetoes Lead to Disappointment, Cautious Optimism

Over the past year, even the most irate objectors to Gov. Jerry Brown's dismantling of redevelopment held out hope that in agreeing to kill redevelopment, the legislature would invent a new, better system for stoking local economic growth. Last week, the governor dashed those hopes.