Mobility Plan Nudges Los Angeles Towards New Transportation Modes

There’s a scene in "X Men Origins: Wolverine" in which a government scientist infuses every bone in the title mutant’s body with an inviolable metal called adamantium. The process is excruciating, but it leaves Wolverine with the distinct benefit of near-indestructibility. And claws.  

That’s kind of like what the city of Los Angeles is doing to its transportation network. With the adoption of Mobility Plan 2035 , the world’s first great automobile-oriented city could become the first city to de-orient itself from the automobile. The city will not merely cease adding lane-miles; it will, in fact, take space away from personal automobiles.  

“In built-out cities, we’re not in the business of widening streets anymore, particularly in downtowns,” said Seleta Reynolds, director of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation. 

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Los Angeles Metro Tackles First Mile, Last Mile Problem

As almost any transportation planner in Los Angeles County will attest, the car capital of the world is well on its way to becoming a transit capital as well. With tens of billions of dollars invested in recently opened and anticipated mass transit lines, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority has transformed the county. Even so, Metro can’t be everywhere. 

Anaheim Reinvents the Train Station

The $188 million Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center (ARTIC), which broke ground earlier this month, is the most recent example of a fast-growing list of public facilities with big ambitions: the local transit hub that connects local and regional transit rail lines with bus service, taxies, bicycle locks and sometimes business services for travelers.  The anticipation of high-speed rail also adds some drama to the Anaheim transit center. 

S.F. Peninsula Cities Cast Wary Eye on High-Speed Rail

With friends like the cities of Palo Alto, Redwood City, and San Mateo, who needs enemies? Certainly not the California High-Speed Rail Authority. 

Federal Transportation Bill Provides Mixed Bag

President Bush’s signature on the federal transportation bill in August opened the spigot for $21.6 billion in federal money for California. The bill funds hundreds of specific projects, ranging from a $25 million “non-motorized transportation pilot program” in Marin County to carpool lanes on the San Diego Freeway in Los Angeles to a study of a new transportation corridor between western Riverside County and Orange County.